Q: What Labor Law Posters Do I Need?

The Department of Labor (DOL) has some workplace posting requirements you need to follow to stay compliant. Let’s take a look at some of the rules regarding labor law posters.

Posting the right way

Here are some general details and requirements when complying with posting requirements:

  • DOL notices are required if you have at least one employee on staff.
  • You can either print each poster yourself or order free copies from the DOL website—whatever suits your fancy.
  • If some people on your team don’t speak English as their first language, be sure to order a version of each poster in whatever language you need.
  • Your posters can hang out for a while. However, they are updated frequently, so stay up-to-date on changes to both state and federal posters.
  • Make sure all your posters are large enough for people to read. There aren’t specific size stipulations for most posters, except the OSHA one (which we’ll explain below).
  • Find a central location for displaying all your workplace notices. Common areas, lunchrooms, and lounges are all great spots to add in a little labor law love.

Your labor law poster lineup

Your requirements will vary based on where your business is located, what kind of company you have, and how many people are on your team. Here’s how to know which posters you’ll need to put up:

Employee Rights Under the Family and Medical Leave Act

If you have 50 or more employees, this poster is singing your name. Essentially, it explains the FMLA parental leave guidelines for both employees and employers. It also outlines who is eligible for coverage, what they should receive, how people can request leave, and what employers should do to comply.

Job Safety and Health: It’s the Law!

This notice breaks down all the protections employees receive under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). If you live somewhere with a state-specific OSHA plan, you may have to post that version instead. You’ll also want to make sure the poster is at least 8½ by 14 inches and printed in a 10-point font.

Equal Employment Opportunity is the Law

This poster reminds everyone that people shouldn’t be treated differently because of who they are. It’s issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and it spells out all of the workplace discrimination laws that safeguard people at work. It also includes information for employees on how to report discrimination.

Employee Rights Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

This sheet is designed for anyone who is covered under the FLSA’s minimum wage rules. It allows everyone to easily find out the current wage, rules on overtime pay and tips, and how the minimum wage is enforced.

Employee Rights for Workers With Disabilities Paid at Special Minimum Wages

If you employ anyone with a disability who earns a special minimum wage, you’ll need to add another version of the FLSA poster to your set. It provides a recap of the overtime and tipping laws, along with a summary of people’s rights.

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Employee Rights Under the National Labor Relations Act

Does anyone on your team belong to a union? If so, you’ll want to get your hands on this poster pronto. The notice lays out your team’s rights as union members and explains what employers and unions need to do to follow the law.

Your Rights Under USERRA: The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act

This poster protects people who leave their jobs to join the military or the National Disaster Medical System. It explains what they’re entitled to receive before and after leaving, along with where to go for help. You actually don’t have to post this anywhere as long as you deliver the sheet to each employee by email, mail, or in person.

To get a summary of your specific federal reporting to-dos, take this FirstStep Poster Advisor quiz from the DOL.

Your state requirements

Once you’re done figuring out which federal posters you need, check out your state labor laws, which build off of the federal requirements above. Since rules can differ depending on which state your business calls home, you’ll have to click through to your state’s labor division to find out what you have to do.

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